Poland Commemorates Auschwitz Liberation Anniversary

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The event was held in the presence of the EU High Representatives for Foreign Affairs and Security Policy Baroness Catherine Ashton, members of the European Commission and the European Parliament, as well as Holocaust survivors, ambassadors and other invited guests. Ronald Lauder, president of the World Jewish Congress, shared a personal testimony of how a visit with his family to Auschwitz changed his life and understanding of the obligation to preserve the memory of the Shoah. In his personal quest to preserve the memory of Auschwitz he found a lifelong partner and friend in then Polish Prime Minister Buzek, who provided help and support. In his keynote speech, Buzek shared his personal experience of growing up in occupied Poland, literally in the shadow of Auschwitz, and his commitment as a Pole and as the president of the European Parliament to preserve the memory of the Nazi death camps and his role in creating an international center to educate future generations. Several speakers talked about how remembrance cannot be a ceremony of only looking back in time but rather to learn the lessons from history as they apply to today”’s situation. How many lives could have been saved if the world community had acted decisively and in time? European Jewish Congress President Moshe Kantor, who shared about the Evian conference of 1938 where the international community failed to open up their borders to the Jews who wanted leave Nazi-Germany and occupied Austria, asked this question. He urged listeners not to make the same mistake today when Israel is threatened with nuclear extermination. Separate ceremonies were held elsewhere in Germany, including at the Buchenwald concentration camp, where elderly survivors gathered and a new memorial in the former factory of the company that made the crematoria ovens for the death camp at Auschwitz-Birkenau. Auschwitz was the most notorious of the Nazi’s many death and concentration camps and the date of its liberation was chosen as International Holocaust Remembrance Day by the United Nations in 2005. Separate ceremonies were held elsewhere in Germany, including at the Buchenwald concentration camp, where elderly survivors gathered, and at a new memorial in the former factory of the company that made the crematoria ovens for Auschwitz-Birkenau. Thursday, Turkey was holding its first official commemorations on international Holocaust remembrance day.

People walk behind a red rose affixed to the main entrance on the Buchenwald concentration camp in Germany during International Holocaust Remembrance Day. More than 250,000 people were held captive in the camp between 1937 and 1945, with more than 50,000 of them dying.

January 27 was chosen as the International Holocaust Remembrance Day by UN’s General Assembly in 2005. It is the anniversary of the liberation of the Nazi concentration camps and the end of the Holocaust which resulted in the annihilation of 6 million European Jews and millions of others by the Nazi German regime. January 27 marks the International Holocaust Remembrance day and the 65th anniversary of the liberation of Auschwitz-Birkenau, the largest Nazi concentration camp by Soviet troops in 1945. It is an annual day of commemoration to honor the victims of the Nazi regime. It was designated by the United Nations General Assembly Resolution 60/7 on 1 November 2005 during the 42nd plenary session.

The General Assembly in 2005 designated Jan. 27, the anniversary of the liberation of Auschwitz-Birkenau, as International Holocaust Remembrance Day, an annual day to honor the victims of the Nazi era. The U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington was scheduled to hold a candle-lighting ceremony in its Hall of Remembrance. The Washington diplomatic community and Holocaust survivors were among those expected to attend, according to the museum. In recognition of that day, and to remember the victims of the Holocaust, January 27 was deemed International Holocaust Remembrance Day (IHRD) by the United Nations in 2005”’the 60th anniversary of the Auschwitz liberation, the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum informs. The U.N. not only created the day to commemorate the Holocaust victims, but also made a point that every nation represented by the U.N. should create programs that will educate others to prevent any genocide of this magnitude, and any other kind, of happening again. They also declared that any denial of the Holocaust will be rejected.

January 27 is the UN designated International Holocaust Remembrance Day, the anniversary of the day in 1945 when the Nazi death camp Auschwitz was liberated. OSWIECIM, Poland – The German and Polish presidents on Thursday urged global vigilance to prevent crimes against humanity as they marked international Holocaust remembrance day at the former Auschwitz death camp. The exhibit is housed in the former administrative building of the Topf & Sons company that collaborated with Hitler’s SS to design and construct special ovens to meet the demands of the death camps. It opens to the public on Thursday, the day of international Holocaust remembrance. Using original blueprints, letters from the Nazi SS, and other documents, the exhibit shows how a “normal” German company, based in the central city of Erfurt, knew and took pride in its role of designing a crucial part of the killing machinery.

A man stands in the exhibition ‘The Engineers of the ‘Final Solution’ Topf & Sons – Builders of the Auschwitz Ovens’ after a press conference in Erfurt, central Germany, on Tuesday, Jan. 25, 2011. The memorial site and educational center to open this week on International Holocaust Remembrance Day documents the role played by a German maker of crematoria in the mass execution of Europe’s Jews and others. Hitler’s top men dreamed up the horrors of the Holocaust, but without the support of German engineers and industrialists like Topf & Sons, they would never have succeeded in murdering millions. Gathering held at Neve Salom synagogue in Istanbul; attended by members of the local Jewish community and the Turkish Foreign Ministry. Turkey held its first-ever state ceremony in memory of the 6 million Jews murdered by the Nazis and their collaborators on Thursday, International Holocaust Remembrance Day. Turkey held its first official commemoration of the Holocaust on International Holocaust Remembrance Day as ”stanbul’s governor and other officials joined members of Turkey’s Jewish community to remember the victims of the Nazi era. (…)