European Jewish Congress welcomes the first ever EU Strategy on Combating Antisemitism and stands ready to assist in its implementation

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(Brussels, 5 October 2021) -The European Jewish Congress welcomes the release of the ground-breaking document, European Union Strategy on Combating Antisemitism and Fostering Jewish Life, and looks forward to working with relevant leaders and officials to ensure its implementation.

The Strategy comprises three pillars; preventing and combating all forms of antisemitism, protecting and fostering Jewish life in the EU, and education, research and Holocaust remembrance. It seeks to place the EU firmly in the lead of the global fight against antisemitism.

The European Commission has called on EU institutions, Member States, international organisations and all civil society actors and citizens to commit to a future free from antisemitism in the EU and beyond.

“This is an unprecedented and vital document that will act as a roadmap to significantly reduce antisemitism in Europe and beyond,” said Dr. Moshe Kantor, President of the European Jewish Congress.

“It is a commitment to the Jews of Europe that we belong and are a vital part of the European future, and the continent’s decision-makers will be making a supreme effort to ensure Jewish life flourishes.”

“As the head of the political representation of all Europe’s Jewish communities, I am pleased that the EU addressed our concerns and recommendations in this initiative and we stand ready to assist in any way towards the implementation of this important strategy.”

The strategy will be implemented over the period 2021-2030. Key elements of the strategy include increased funding and operational support for the protection of synagogues and Jewish communal buildings, enhanced training for justice and law enforcement, ensuring that EU funding does not fund hatred or violence in third countries, a new European research hub on contemporary antisemitism and Jewish life and culture, and encouraging all EU member states that have not yet adopted the IHRA definition of antisemitism to do so.

“Combatting antisemitism is the cornerstone for maintaining vibrant and contributing Jewish life in Europe,” Dr Kantor said. “This document and the involvement of the most senior actors working in this field, notably European Commission President von der Leyen, Vice President Schinas, and Coordinator on combating antisemitism and fostering Jewish life Katharina von Schnurbein, demonstrates clearly that words are being turned into positive actions.”